Sunday is coming! “The parable of the overtly responsible son” Luke 15:1-3, 11b-32, Lent 4C

“But we had to celebrate because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.” (Luke 15:32)

[An alternative telling of Luke 15:11b-32…]

Once there was a man who had two sons. The eldest son was hard-working and knew his place. One day the family farm would be his, and the responsibility of managing the estate, the business and their employees would eventually all fall upon his shoulders. He got up early and worked late seeking to gain the experience, know-how and work ethic required to be successful. As he prepared for his coming future, he sought the wisdom and counsel of his father.

The younger son was no farmer. He slept late. He was not dependable. He was lazy and spent his time day-dreaming of a life (and lifestyle) that was far away. He was more or less useless when it came to the family business, did not manage his affairs particularly well, and was not much a planner. But his father loved him, as did his older brother.

One day to the older son’s shock, a hired hand told him of his brother’s departure.

Not only had he left to seek his fortune on the road elsewhere, he had dishonorably talked their father into splitting the family inheritance and giving him his portion to him now. As he left home, it was the equivalent of saying his family ‘was dead to him.’

It hurt to hear this news.

The eldest was mortified. His father had been duped. His job would become more difficult. Business would be much more challenging with far less capital to utilize. He was furious. What hurt the most was that his brother did not have the decency to say ‘goodbye.’

In the years that followed, the older son became a hard man. His disdain towards his brother’s selfishness grew. He also came to resent his father’s foolishness. Since his father could not be trusted to make sound financial decisions, the eldest pushed him away.

The father was relegated to the sideline as his eldest son took over the business.

With hard work and time, the farm became a better success than ever. The latest projections indicated that in only a few short months the worth of their estate would double from its original size before his father had cut it in half. To make the next push forward, it would mean taking on more hands to increase yield. This was their year.

If there was a time to celebrate his success…it was now.

Coming back from the fields in the evening one day, the older son heard the music before he saw the party.  For all his father’s faults at least he had recognized how his efforts saved their family from ruin. As he drew closer to the party, the older son began preparing his speech; thanking his father for the opportunity to lead and for all those in his employ for their hard work and dedication. All he had ever hoped for was coming to be. He stood outside, took a deep breath and looked into the party through the doorway.

Then he saw…him.

Not only was his younger brother present, he was making a mockery of everything this older son had accomplished since he had left. He was wearing his father’s robe and ring. He looked scrawny, sickly and aged by hard times, but he was laughing and joyous, drinking his older brother’s wine and eating a feast prepared for him. FOR HIM.

His father had his arm around his younger son.

The older son was not sure which one he was going to confront first as he clenched his fists and his heart pounded so hard it almost burst through his chest.

His father came outside to meet him instead. It required all of the older son’s willpower not to lay him out on the floor, or shout in his face. Instead, the father could see the rage in his eldest son and put his arm around him. In that embrace, his son gave him a piece of his mind, saying he did not deserve this kind of treatment. His absent, wasteful, deplorable brother did not deserve this either. His father held him a little tighter, paused, turned to face him, looked him in the eye and said,

“Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. But we had to celebrate because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.” (Luke 15:31-32)

The older son stood firmly in his place, watching the celebration as his father took him by the arm to invite him inside.

If you were standing there, what would you do next?

PGS

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